Welcome

Welcome to an unofficial website, dedicated since 2008 to supporting the incredible talents of Tom Riley, the versatile British actor and producer. Tom was most recently seen as Claude Sabine in Amazon Prime's new series The Collection, on cinema screens in UK as Tom Ray in Starfish, and on ITV Encore as DI Wagstaffe in Dark Heart. 

Tom Riley has received wide critical acclaim, and awards recognition for his stage, television and film performances. He is perhaps best known for his leading television roles: Leonardo da Vinci in three seasons of Starz Da Vinci's Demons - a role which won Tom the BAFTA Cymru best actor award, and a Cablefax Programme Awards honourable mention as best actor in 2014, Robin Hood in Doctor Who Robot of Sherwood, Laurence Shepherd in two series of ITV's Monroe, Gavin Sorensen in ITV's Bouquet Of Barbed Wire, and Mr Wickham in ITV's Lost In Austen. Other notable television appearances include Poirot: Appointment With Death as Raymond Boynton, and Lewis: And The Moonbeams Kiss The Sea as Philip Horton.

Tom Ray in Starfish, Mike in Pushing Dead, Parker-Hall in Kill Your Friends, are just some of Tom's most recent film roles. Earlier lead film roles include Freddie in Happy Ever Afters, Joe in I Want Candy and David in A Few Days in September

Nominated as Outstanding Featured Actor In A Play at the 2011 Drama Desk Awards for his role as Septimus Hodge in Arcadia on Broadway, Tom's other theatre credits include numerous productions at the Royal Court Theatre, and the Riverside Studios' 2010 world premiere of Hurts Given and Received by Howard Barker. For this he received outstanding reviews, and a nomination for best performance in the 2010 Off West End Theatre Awards. Tom was most recently seen on stage as Richard Kenton in the world premiere of the Stephen Poliakoff play My City at the Almeida Theatre in 2011.

Tom recently finished filming Ill Behaviour, a three part comedy drama, written by Sam Bain for the BBC. Feature film Modern Life Is Rubbish will be released in 2017. Further details of Tom's career can be found elsewhere on the site.

The Shadow Hours: Mindfield Film Festival Gold Award

The Los Angeles Minefield Film Festival runs monthly competitions for submitted films, and The Shadow Hours won a Gold Award in the April 2017 competition!

The annual Minefield Film Festival will take place in August 2017, and monthly competition winners are automatically in the official selection for the festival. Look out for a screening of The Shadow Hours!

Starfish: DVD extras included

Included on the Starfish DVD released today, are a number of interesting extras, which certainly provide an added reason to purchase the DVD soonest from Amazon and other retailers. None of these extras were listed anywhere that I can see, so I have included a list below.

The behind the scenes look is an re-edited version of what has been shared online in the past by Lands End, and includes onset interviews, and the above glimpse of Tom and Joanne Froggatt having some kind of photoshoot for the film. I don't think it is a deleted scene. 

The premiere interviews seem to be the ones shown at the special screenings, and also includes some of the recently shared behind the scenes glimpses. 

Starfish: Tom Riley has to deliver a gruelling physical performance

Starfish is released in the UK today, on DVD and digital. It is available to buy from Amazon, HMV, Tesco and Sainsburys. For digital fans, buy and download via Sky and iTunes.

A great new review has been shared by Britflicks.com, who gave it 4 stars, with kind words about Tom's performance.

We’re told at the start that “all this is true” and it’s reflected in director Bill Clark’s dignified approach to the subject, one that isn’t afraid to present us with the truth of what is a lesser known - and all the more terrifying - disease. One that is contracted by 250,000 people every year and which kills 50,000.

The prosthetics bring that reality home: Tom’s stumps and the inescapable effect on his face, which means he has to drink through a straw and dribbles almost constantly. It means Tom Riley has to deliver a gruelling physical performance, especially during the watershed moment at the end of the film. In such a dignified movie, he’s a man who’s lost his own personal dignity.

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